Worship Leading Takes Work Have you stalled out?

“Ambitious parents who are currently playing the ‘Baby Mozart’ video for their toddlers
may be disappointed to learn that Mozart became Mozart by working furiously hard.” 
― Geoff Colvin, Talent is Overrated: What Really Separates World-Class Performers from Everybody Else

Worship Have you had those weeks in worship when you have prepared diligently, rehearsed the team, practiced the cues and got everything “right” but then when church happened, it all fell apart? Inversely, how ‘bout those weeks where you hardly make a plan but somehow everything was pure fire? Worship ministry can be mysterious; sometimes it feels like the results are out of our hands. If you are like me you’ve had seasons where you’ve taken this dynamic for granted and rested too much on the mercy and favor of God.

Rehearsal Tip #1: Step Away From the Mic

Finding Balance with Vocal Ensembles

A few weeks ago during an early morning worship band rehearsal at Vineyard Community Church I asked our sound  team member to capture something (on his iPhone) we’ve been doing for a long time: stepping away from the mic to hear and tweak our vocals. Check it out here:

In our world of in-ear monitors we can easily loose the humanity of our harmony because we are so separated by sound technology. This is the same with wedge monitors as well. To remedy this, we periodically  get close to one another in a circle and sing the song. We look each other in the eye and communicate in a way that is impossible looking forward and hearing the band in the vacuum of our monitoring. In bluegrass music there is oftentimes just one mic that all the musicians share; they use proximity to balance the instruments and voices. I have found this is a beautiful way to enjoy and tweak what we really sound like! Try it during your next rehearsal. Exercises like this and more are a part of the worship training I do in churches, check it out HERE.